faculty_fellows

Faculty Teaching Fellowships

Applications are currently being accepted for CETL Faculty Teaching Fellowships for 2017-18. CETL will award four to five University Faculty Teaching Fellowships for 2017-18. Applicants must demonstrate a strong commitment to teaching and be willing to participate in a scholarship of teaching and learning research project of their choice. The fellowship includes $15,000 that can be used for a teaching release (with departmental approval), summer support, travel, research supplies, and/or a GRA/GTA line.

Requirements:

  1. Be a full-time faculty member
  2. Serve as a teaching fellow by leading a Faculty Teaching & Learning Community (Faculty-TaLC)
  3. Conduct research in the area of teaching and learning
  4. Demonstrate a commitment to excellence in college teaching
  5. Participate in a scholarship of teaching and learning conference
Apply for a Fellowship
Applications due May 5 at 5 p.m. via the iCollege portal.

Sign in with your CampusID and password. CETL Faculty Fellows Applications are listed as a course for all faculty in iCollege.

Submit an Application 

Direct questions to Laura Carruth (CETL Director) at lcarruth@gsu.edu

Nominees should submit:

  1. A curriculum vitae that highlights teaching and research in the scholarship of teaching and learning
  2. An online application that includes information on project design and budget

Applications are due by May 5 at 5 p.m., and should be submitted via the iCollege portal using your GSU CampusID and password.
Log in to iCollege with your CampusID and password and select the course listed as CETL Faculty Fellows Applications to apply.

  Log In to iCollege to Submit Your CETL Faculty Fellows Application >


2016-2017 Faculty Fellows

Toby Bolsen, Associate Professor, Political Science

bolsenOur research focuses on best pedagogical practices for teaching American Government in the digital age. We have designed and implemented surveys and experiments in large sections of Introduction to American Government to assess the effectiveness of online textbooks and other interactive digital tools for increasing objective knowledge and civic engagement. We plan to use the CETL Fellowship to build on our ongoing efforts by conducting an experiment that focuses on the role that static versus adaptive feedback and personalized learning can play in increasing learning and retention of course material in American Government. We plan to present the results at an upcoming conference highlighting scholarship on teaching and learning.

*Dr. Bolsen is a Co-Fellow with Dr. Michael Evans (Political Science)

 

Jeremy Brazas, Lecturer, Department of Mathematics & Statistics

brazasThe ever-increasing role of technology in everyday life and work prompts questions about the skills and understandings needed for effective use of that technology. The tools available for obtaining, managing, synthesizing, analyzing, and communicating information are constantly changing and adapting as the range of information and communication technology (ICT) tools grows ever greater. As technological capabilities advance within scientific fields, required skills and understandings to solve mathematical problems necessarily shift in response. The competence and knowledge to effectively solve mathematical problems with a variety of resources and computational tools at hand is what we refer to as mathematical digital literacy. Despite the rapid rise in the need for these technological skills, the content of mathematics courses has mostly remained unchanged. This is, in part, due to the fact that digital literacy as it pertains to mathematical problem solving is not well-understood. In collaboration with Dr. Todd Abel of Appalachian State University, my project proposes to identify components of mathematical digital literacy in the work of students throughout the Calculus sequence. With a better understanding of what mathematical digital literacy is, we can begin to promote digital literacy as content in its own right and search for ways to integrate it naturally into college mathematics courses.

Faculty Teaching Fellow Jeremy Brazas received an award from the Mathematical Association of America Southeastern Section Award for Distinguished Teaching by a Beginning University Faculty Member.

Jeremy is also the co-coordinator for the CETL Faculty-TaLC on Digital Literacy Across the Curriculum.

 

Michael Evans, Lecturer, Political Science

evansOur research focuses on best pedagogical practices for teaching American Government in the digital age. We have designed and implemented surveys and experiments in large sections of Introduction to American Government to assess the effectiveness of online textbooks and other interactive digital tools for increasing objective knowledge and civic engagement. We plan to use the CETL Fellowship to build on our ongoing efforts by conducting an experiment that focuses on the role that static versus adaptive feedback and personalized learning can play in increasing learning and retention of course material in American Government. We plan to present the results at an upcoming conference highlighting scholarship on teaching and learning.

*Dr. Evans is a Co-Fellow with Dr. Toby Bolsen (Political Science)

 

Betty Lai, Assistant Professor, School of Public Health

laiDr. Lai’s project will examine the impact of enhancing growth mindsets on student self-efficacy in graduate statistics courses. Students with a growth mindset believe that they are able to grow their abilities by working hard and trying new strategies when they face challenges. In contrast, students with a fixed mindset feel that intelligence is set and cannot change (Dweck, 2008). Targeted activities in this project will include i) psychoeducation about the science of learning, and ii) the creation of “open” tasks that encourage decision making and learning.

 

John Weber, Assistant Professor, Georgia Perimeter–Mathematics

weberDr. Weber uses inquiry-based learning (IBL) in his mathematics classrooms. He has proposed to investigate student engagement within classroom IBL activities. More specifically, he wants to identify and describe student’s attitudes toward engagement; to identify and classify why students are motivated to engage with other students and with the mathematical content underlying the activity; and to identify and classify why students hesitate to engage in the classroom. Once students’ motivations and hesitations are known, then classroom activities can be designed to encourage students to overcome their hesitations. Dr. Weber will develop a survey instrument to identify students’ motivations and hesitations to engage in the IBL activity. By understanding students’ motivations and hesitations to engage, class activities can be designed and modified to increase the engagement of students and to promote students’ understanding of mathematics.

 

Robin Wharton, Lecturer, English

Dr. Wharton’s project examines the potential of differentiated instruction and gamified assessment strategies in digitally-saturated first-year composition classes. Using a mixed methods approach that blends quantitative and qualitative analysis, this IRB-approved study focuses on four questions:

whartonWriting: Does creating scaffolded opportunities for students to customize the instruction they receive based on their own self-assessment of what they need to accomplish a particular task or project improve their confidence as writers as measured by entry and exit surveys, and their competence as measured by their performance on course assignments?

Engagement: Does gamification work as a strategy for increasing student investment, engagement, and participation in hybrid and traditional composition classes?

Digital Literacy: Does their involvement in a course like this increase students’ rhetorical awareness across multiple modes and media as measured by their performance on course assignments, and confidence in their ability to use digital tools as part of the composition process as measured by entry and exit surveys?

Time Management: When given a choice of equally pedagogically sound activities directed to a particular course goal or desired learning outcome what choices do students make and why?

Using the support she receives as a faculty teaching fellow, Dr. Wharton will develop a web application to help students set goals and track their progress through a course. For instructors, the application will streamline the process of responding to and evaluating student work, and facilitate data collection for the study.


Previous Fellows

2015-2016